Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from July, 2015
Statistics: What do they really mean?

     We've all run across statistics that do not tell the true story, or the story that we know. I'm curious why schools tend to cater to the 1%ers.  You know the saying, "the squeaky wheel gets the grease."  It seems to me that the 1%ers are those that tend to make the most noise. Think about @realDonaldTrump  's campaign this summer. He is not predicted to win the nomination, but he is currently leading the Republican candidates. And, he has certainly been squeaky.       In education, the mandates tend to be about the GT crowd and the SPED crowd. Academic targets are based on advancing those students who can score advanced and nudging others closer to proficiency.  Neither of these groups is huge, but these two groups do tend to dictate time and resources spent in a school. I began to think about how a school decides what is best for the students.  Is it really based on statistics, or is it indeed based on a series of squea…

Mountaintop experiences

Mountaintop Experiences




This summer as I've read the tweets from various education conferences, I've noticed an interesting development. Dancing on tables and singing party songs all of which are intended to allow teachers to feel empowered and inspired.

Mountaintop experiences are enjoyable, but they simply are not sustainable. Sir Winston Churchill said, "Mountaintops  inspire leaders but valleys mature them."  Teachers go to conferences to learn new strategies to help their students. Being inspired and empowered by a mountaintop experience may help teachers return to their positions, but will it really change how they teach or approach education? Could it actually set teachers up for frustration when they realize that these grand ambitions may not work with their administration or state requirements? Mountaintop experiences are inspiring for teachers, but they need support within their school to find the inspiration to continue to teach.

I am not regularly a nay …